The purpose of this "blog" is to make my essays that have been
published online accessible in one place. Current essays are on
top and older pieces farther down, though they are not presented
in strict chronological order. The postings or "blog archive" list
serves as a kind of index. Since most of my essay links were posted
at once in May of 2009, click "2009" under the blog archive column
and a list of essays will appear. Each essay is briefly described and a
link provided.

My formative writing experiences were as a grassroots organizer
and activist in campaigns to make polluters accountable. I wrote
newsletters, pamphlets, press releases, op-ed pieces, and statements
to be read at hearings, debates, and panel discussions. I did hundreds
of interviews for outlets as diverse as NPR, CBS, BBC, and CNN.

During this time I was also a library manager and administrator.
Although one might not suspect so, the role of the librarian and
the role of the activist share much in common. Effective activists
provoke public dialog. Effective librarians invite such dialogue.
Although they employ different methods, the ends are the same.

Eventually, I wrote two books about my political adventures,
Canaries on the Rim: Living Downwind in the West (Verso,
1999) and Hope's Horizon: Three Visions for Healing the
American Land(Island/Shearwater, 2004).

We spent the last two centuries learning how Nature can create wealth.
We will spend the next century learning how Nature creates health.
Ultimately, as we learn to live in reciprocal and sustainable
relationship with the ecosystems that sustain us, we will replace
the cultural language of wealth that both expresses and guides our
behavior today with a new language of health.

I am not talking here about mere words. I mean the way we see the
world, the way we express our values, and the way we make choices
together. The difference between those two ways of seeing and being
in the world are profound.

Wealth says more; health says enough.
Wealth says accumulate;
health says flow. Wealth says compete and win; health says
reciprocate, integrate, reconcile. Wealth says manage and
measure; health says jam and dance. Wealth assigns value; health
assumes it. Wealth adds, subtracts, and divides; health makes whole.

To learn this new language, we begin by listening. When we translate
what we learn into behaviors, we are practicing what I call ecological
citizenship. Ultimately, the health of our natural/physical
environment is directly related to the vitality of our civic
environment. And if you dig deeper, environmental crises are
also about our disconnection from nature and from each other.
And so we confront not only entrenched powers and their
destructive interests, but a culture that enables us, even
encourages us, to think and feel and act as if we live apart from
nature. As I try to explain in the essays that follow, nature is
embedded in us as we are embedded in the ecosystems that sustain us.

Chip Ward

moonbolt3@hotmail.com

Thursday, May 28, 2009

Faux Nuke Test - Divine Strake


Pentagon Fireworks Deferred: Divine Strake, Hellish Repercussions

Adding insult to injury, the Pentagon planned to blow up at the Nevada Test Site enough explosives to imitate a small nuclear weapon and send a huge mushroom cloud of unknown chemicals and possibly radioactive dirt upwind from American citizens who have lived downwind before. In the 50's and 60's, more than a hundred open air tests of atomic/nuclear weapons were conducted in Nevada and the whole nation got dosed with radioactive fallout. Subsequent "underground" tests leaked plenty more radioactive fallout. People in Utah got the worst of it and many also got sick and died. I described this in my first book, Canaries on the Rim: Living Downwind in the West. The latest test, designed to imitate a new class of "bunker-buster" nuke weapons the military wanted to create, was called off after considerable protest. The essay is still relevant even though the military seems to have surrendered its plan to make mini-nukes because it reveals a mindset that still exists and an infrastructure that still exists.

This one, as usual, appeared at topmdispatch.com and then went wide and far. This link is to a web site that republishes most of my essays.

http://hnn.us/roundup/entries/27480.html

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